People

People management

Klabin’s cultural evolution, focused on engaging people, delivering results and building the future, and the consolidation of the #Atitude Klabin model in 2019 were fundamental in achieving the Company’s results. We reinforced these fronts during several opportunities for dialogue, communication and initiatives in the period.

Our people management focuses on developing talent to leverage operational efficiency of the business model, one of the pillars of the Klabin growth plan. Our leaders play the role of protagonists in this process. People management policies and strategies provide a continuous learning experience for employees, stimulate innovation, promote diversity and a culture of appreciating life, through a safe and healthy environment.

Cultural evolution

GRI 103-1, 103-2, 103-3

Klabin’s organizational culture reinforces and catalyzes our ability to adapt to change in an agile, innovative and competent manner. We consider this culture to be a precious and driving factor in the history that Klabin has been building for 120 years. The flexibility and agility that we have instituted to respond to society’s constant transformations preserve our essence while building our growth trajectory, thus reflecting this culture.

Practices adopted in 2019 further emphasized our management focused on attitudes such as adaptability, agility and simplification, exemplified in the incorporation of digital platforms into our routine: we began to participate in more meetings via videoconference, share data via cloud and communicate more digitally. Learn more in Information Technology for Klabin of the future.

Aligned leadership

The 3rd Klabin Managers Convention was held in 2019 and represented an important forum for aligning the Company’s cultural evolution and strategy. At the meeting, videos recorded by the managers themselves were shown, with testimonials that demonstrated daily attitudes in line with the organizational culture.

After the Convention, leaders shared and reinforced such topics with their teams, as a way of leveraging cultural evolution at Klabin.

Employee profile

GRI 102-7, 102-8

Klabin’s workforce experienced no significant variation in 2019, ending the period with 14,608 employees. There was a change, however, in the worker profile, with a 19% increase in the group of those over 50 years of age, when compared to 2018. The proportion of women on the staff increased by 2% in the period. Such aspects reinforce the generation diversity and gender actions.

Number of employees by employment contract and gender

Employment contract 2017 2018 2019
Men Women Total Men Women Total Men Women Total
Indefinite term 12.991 1.413 14.404 12.804 1.466 14.270 12.538 1.710 14.248
Indefinite term
Others (apprentices and trainees) 181 175 356 254 267 521 163 197 360
Total 13.172 1.588 14.760 13.058 1.733 14.791 12.701 1.907 14.608

Number of employees by employment contract and region

Region1 2017 2018 2019
Direct employees Indirect employees Others (apprentices and trainees) Direct employees Indirect employees Others (apprentices and trainees) Direct employees Indirect employees Others (apprentices and trainees)
Northern Region 200 5 242 4 221 22 3
Northeastern Region 1.255 161 44 1.289 315 48 1.256 230 25
Southeastern Region 3.117 374 113 2.919 384 122 2.998 1.108 124
Southern Region 9.832 4.636 194 9.820 4.642 347 9.773 5.591 208
Total 14.404 5.171 356 14.270 5.341 521 14.248 6.951 360

1There are no employees in the Midwest region.

Number of employees by employment type

Employment type 2017 2018 2019
Men Women Total Men Women Total Men Women Total
Full-time employment 12.991 1.413 14.404 12.804 1.466 14.270 12.538 1.710 14.248
Part-time employment
Others (apprentices and trainees) 181 175 356 254 267 521 163 197 360
Total 13.172 1.588 14.760 13.058 1.733 14.791 12.701 1.907 14.608

Number of employees by employment contract and business unit

Business unit 2017 2018 2019
Direct employees Indirect employees Others (apprentices and trainees) Direct employees Indirect employees Others (apprentices and trainees) Direct employees Indirect employees Others (apprentices and trainees)
✔ Papers 3.534 1.696 81 3.553 1.454 105 3.510 1.798 50
✔ Forestry 3.923 2.041 47 3.862 2.192 169 3.670 2.942 118
Packaging and Recycled Materials 4.145 422 123 3.960 553 161 3.903 570 112
Sacks 1.114 157 46 1.124 204 16 1.128 152 29
Corporate 875 91 43 958 107 35 961 674 36
Pulp for paper 813 764 16 813 831 35 1.076 815 15
Total 14.404 5.171 356 14.270 5.341 521 14.248 6.951 360

Direct and indirect employees

In general, approximately 32% of our staff was composed of indirect employees in 2019, up five percentage points from 2018, with greater emphasis on the Forestry unit, where this increase was eight percentage points.

The indirect employees perform activities to support each business’s end activities and comply with the precepts of working hours, remuneration and other legal requirements, including the freedom of collective association.

The following tables contain a breakdown of Klabin’s direct employees by age group and functional category of governance body members:

Age group

2017 2018 2019
Men Women Men Women Men Women
Under 30 years of age 4.232 769 3.628 799 3.337 848
Between 30 and 50 7.690 720 8.159 834 7.829 965
years of age 1.250 99 1.271 100 1.535 94
Total 13.172 1.588 13.058 1.733 12.701 1.907

Functional category1

2017 2018 2019
Men Women Men Women Men Women
Executive Board 13 1 12 1 11 1
Management and coordination 417 100 434 105 484 124
Technical 652 109 687 126 760 514
Administrative 703 667 691 701 679 431
Operational 11,206 536 10,980 533 10,566 633
Apprentices 134 121 184 186 111 124
Interns 47 54 70 81 52 73
Total 13,172 1,588 13.058 1,733 12,663 1,900

1The group of professionals identified as “Board of Directors” is contained in the “Administrative” group to consolidate the other indicators until 2018.

Governance bodies

Governance bodies 2017 2018 2019
Men Women Men Women Men Women
Board of Directors 20 5 22 5 27 6

Talent management

GRI 103-1, 103-2, 103-3

An engaged and trained team, in search of constant development contributes to increased productivity. Trained employees are able to simplify work, foster innovation, contribute to operational efficiency and, consequently, deliver sustainable results.

Klabin’s management of the subject focuses on permanent employee development, a robust succession chain and the training of extraordinary leaders, as we believe that cultural evolution for the Company to execute its strategic plan is only possible with a strong leadership team, with behaviors and skills capable of delivering results both now and in the future.

What drives management

The Training and Development Policy enables employee training and knowledge enhancement, conducted through the Klabin Business School, with mandatory and optional training on a wide variety of topics: work routines, specific duties, specializations and general knowledge. Internal and external audits are conducted on specific processes (mandatory training, for example).

Focus on strengthening the succession chain

In 2019, many people management efforts were focused on identifying and training successors. We revised the Performance Cycle, a process for evaluating and discussing Performance and Potential, which generates relevant inputs for good development conversations. The Cycle provided us with inputs to form a pilot group of 20 employees who participated in a new initiative at the Company: the Development Acceleration Program for leaders, starting in August.

Based on a robust process of evaluating skills and behaviors, the program helps build and execute a strong plan that accelerates these leaders’ development for the next career step It prioritizes the concept of continuing education under self-directed learning in the daily life and culture of the company, reinforcing autonomy as a core part of the process. The program remains in 2020.

Forming high performance teams

In 2019, we worked hard to develop high-performance teams, with actions focused on strengthening collaboration, trust, transparency, agility and innovation, which further engaged the mid-level leadership in guiding our cultural evolution and leveraging extraordinary and sustainable results.

Leadership training

The Rumos Program, which is part of the Klabin Business School, stands out among the leadership development actions as an innovative knowledge transfer model. . It seeks to strengthen the holistic and strategic vision of the business and portray how the parameters followed in different areas come together to obtain results.

Rumos 1.0

Created in 2015, focused on managers and specialists.

It trains the manager to deeply understand the Klabin value chain.

Over 550 managers and specialists had participated in the program by the end of 2019, which represents almost 100% of the target audience.

Rumos 2.0

Created in 2018, focused on managers and, as of 2019, on coordinators as well.

It develops competencies and skills with a focus on people and innovation, based on the chain vision and operational efficiency.

In 2019, 130 coordinators and 90 managers participated in the program, which has a satisfaction rating of 92%.

Klabin Business School

The Klabin Business School (ENK) is our learning platform organized as knowledge tracks, with on-site and online initiatives (ENK Portal). Its purpose is to develop our employees, preparing them for current and future challenges in order to leverage business objectives.

ENK’s goals are related to levels of satisfaction, applicability, effectiveness and impact in the business area, such as the goal of 85% satisfaction in the Leadership Program, which was exceeded with an index of 92% achieved in 2019. There are others related to specific projects, which seek to improve the School and its performance model.

Based on the understanding that knowledge only grows when shared and for the purpose of supporting the value chain, we also offer the ENK Family Portal, available to employees and their dependents, with content for all age groups.

The ENK Portal has more than 11,000 users across all Klabin units; the ENK Family Portal already has a total of approximately 40,000 users.

Training conducted in 2019

GRI 404-1

The training actions in 2019 are aligned with the Company’s organic growth. The following training solutions are considered: technical, behavioral and leadership training, respecting each employee’s career level and momentum, through classroom, , in company, and open courses, participation in congresses, among others.

In 2019, 783,000 hours of training were offered, 82% of which was to operational teams.

Average hours of training that the organization’s employees have undertaken, by gender

 

2016 2017 2018 2019
Men 48,73 47,37 49,63 54,61
Women 40,47 39,85 40,82 48,47
Total 47,84 46,56 48,59 53,81

Average hours of training that the organization’s employees have undertaken by employee category1

2016 2017 2018 2019
Executive Board 4,12 5,45 4,55 2,86
Management and coordination 31,58 32,93 38,42 39,19
Technical 114,61 122,30 60,11 45,04
Administrative 20,62 17,53 30,09 36,61
Operational 48,21 46,31 51,40 57,25
Apprentices 19,00 36,38 23,84 35,93
Interns 44,28 67,10
Total 47,82 46,56 48,59 53,81

1The differences in hours of training observed in the Technical and Administrative categories mainly refer to a reorganization of the positions by category, used as a premise in the preparation of this report.

Employee journey

GRI 103-1, 103-2, 103-3

Providing our employees with the best experience and continuous learning from the time of their hiring – and even before, during the selection process – and throughout their journey is as important as maintaining a cohesive group of leaders in the Company.

Managing our talents through retention actions promotes the maturity of employee relationships, improves the climate results and also contributes to strengthening external trust relationships with suppliers, clients and partners, which directly impacts the Company’s results.

Internal recruitment is a priority

We prioritize internal recruitment to fill positions, giving employees the opportunity to progress within the Company. In this case, vacancies are published through the Internal Opportunities Panel (accessed via the intranet). When positions are not filled internally, we resort to external recruitment through partnerships with websites and our institutional talent database as well (online platform available on our website).

We began a corporate Internship Program in 2019, applied to all of the company’s units, focused on aligning the selection process and development plan, in addition to generating greater visibility and broadening the Klabin brand in universities and across social media

Our main commitments

  1. Work our employer brand through several channels, such as participation in university fairs and communication initiatives on social media.
  2. Quality service for internal clients to ensure that positions are filled with qualified professionals that adhere to the required profile.
  3. Provide candidates with a respectful and professional experienceexperience during the selection process.
  4. Promote quality and enticing integration to employees who join Klabin, focused on contributing to the professionals’ development and engagement and providing immersion into all of the Company’s business. In 2019, nine Corrugated Board and Recycled Materials units, two Industrial Bags units and two Paper units had already adopted the new integration model, which began in 2018 in a gradual manner.

Climate survey

In 2019, we conducted the Organizational Climate Survey with our employees. Its execution was 100% digital for the first time, with 88% adherence. The survey is an important tool that measures the effectiveness of our people management practices throughout the employee’s journey. It has been conducted since 2001 at Klabin. GPTW began handling the task in 2012 and a two-year periodicity was adopted. The Hay Group (currently Korn Ferry) became responsible for the task as of 2017.

Check out the key results of the survey conducted in 2019:

88%

adherence, compared to 87% in the last survey conducted in 2017.

Respective indexes of

85% and 83%,

for the Engagement factor and for Well-being and Respect.

Overall favorability index of

76%

76%: up 3 percentage points from the survey conducted in 2017.

* The scale used to measuring the employee engagement were a 5 point scale (1 – strongly disagree, 2- disagree, 3- don’t disagree nor agree, 4 “agree” and 5- “strongly agree”). The percentage of  answers 4 “agree” or 5 ‘strongly agree” made up the Klabin’s Favorability Index.

12% of surveyed employees stated they were women.

Rate of new employees and turnover

GRI 401-1

The number of terminations exceeded hirings at Klabin in 2019. Regarding age groups, a greater renovation of human resources is observed, reinforced by the structuring of the apprentice and trainee programs. The most significant movements in hiring and termination occurred in the South, due to expansion of the forestry base. Business movements often justify the slowdown of operations in certain cities to make room for a ramp-up in others. The following tables portray our turnover indicators, which consider apprentices and interns in the admissions and terminations base.

In 2019, considering the 2,318 employees hired and 2,405 terminated, the accumulated turnover rate for the year was 15.94%. If only voluntary turnover is considered, with employees who left the company for their own purposes, the rate drops to 2.18%.

Cumulative turnover rate turnover

2016 2017 2018 2019
18,22% 16,29% 15,94% 15,93%

Total number and rate of new employee hires, by age group

2016 2017 2018 2019
Total number Rate Total number Rate Total number Rate Total number Rate
Under 30 years of age 1.590 54% 1.431 51% 1.511 64% 1.376 59%
Between 30 and 50 1.261 43% 1.240 45% 812 34% 885 38%
years of age 107 4% 114 4% 50 2% 57 2%
Total 2.958 100% 2.785 100% 2.373 100% 2.318 100%

Total number and rate of employee turnover, by age group

2016 2017 2018 2019
Total number Rate Total number Rate Total number Rate Total number Rate
Under 30 years of age 877 46% 855 43% 954 41% 1.048 44%
Between 30 and 50 871 45% 916 46% 1.133 49% 1.114 46%
years of age 177 9% 200 10% 238 10% 243 10%
Total 1.925 100% 1.971 100% 2.325 100% 2.405 100%

Total number and rate of employee hires, by gender

2016 2017 2018 2019
Total number Rate Total number Rate Total number Rate Total number Rate
Men 2.475 84% 2.416 87% 1.835 77% 1.682 73%
Women 483 16% 369 13% 538 23% 636 27%
Total 2.958 100% 2.785 100% 2.373 100% 2.318 100%

Total number and rate of employee turnover, by gender

2016 2017 2018 2019
Total number Rate Total number Rate Total number Rate Total number Rate
Men 1.583 82% 1.661 84% 1.946 84% 1.986 83%
Women 342 18% 310 16% 379 16% 419 17%
Total 1.925 100% 1.971 100% 2.325 100% 2.405 100%

Total number and rate of employee hires, by region1

2016 2017 2018 2019
Total number Rate Total number Rate Total number Rate Total number Rate
Northern Region 257 9% 50 2% 67 3% 55 2%
Northeastern Region 183 6% 133 5% 149 6% 147 6%
Southeastern Region 539 18% 328 12% 435 18% 0 0%
Southern Region 1.979 67% 2.274 82% 1.722 73% 451 19%
Total 2.958 100% 2.785 100% 2.373 100% 1.665 72%

11Klabin has no operations in the Midwest region

Total number and rate employee turnover, by region1

2016 2017 2018 2019
Total number Rate Total number Rate Total number Rate Total number Rate
Northern Region 33 2% 63 3% 37 2% 69 3%
Northeastern Region 181 9% 198 10% 147 6% 156 6%
Southeastern Region 452 23% 389 20% 581 25% 0 0%
Southern Region 1.259 65% 1.321 67% 1.560 67% 451 19%
Total 1.925 100% 1.971 100% 2.325 100% 1.729 72%

11Klabin has no operations in the Midwest region

Maternity and paternity leave

GRI 401-3

Klabin joined the federal government’s Empresa Cidadã program in 2019, whose main action is to extend the parental leave period. With the increasingly higher ratio of women in our workforce, we also see higher retention of members of this group who return from maternity leave and are still with the company 12 months after returning, showing greater stability for the gender.

Maternity and paternity leave information1

2016 2017 2018 2019
Total number of employees who took maternity/paternity leave men 409 392 150 650
women 45 64 94 91
Total number of employees who returned to work, during the reporting period, after maternity/paternity leave men 409 392 150 650
women 45 64 94 91
Total number of employees who returned to work after maternity/paternity leave and who were still employed 12 months after returning to work men 409 345 144 628
women 31 50 78 80
Rate of return men 100% 100% 100% 100%
women 100% 100% 100% 100%
Retention rate men 100% 88% 96% 97%
women 69% 78% 83% 88%

1We do not monitor the number of employees entitled to take maternity/paternity leave. Due to the nature of the leave, we understand that it is available to all employees. The concept of termination is comprehensive and its database also includes voluntary terminations.

Recognition

Klabin’s Policy on Fundamental Rights in Labor Relations  determines that balance in remuneration constitutes a retention factor for qualified employees, ensuring the non-interference of criteria such as race, color, gender, religious or sexual orientation, social origin, appearance, age, physical disability and special needs.

In 2019, we sought to simplify the Performance Cycle and made improvements to the employee performance and potential evaluation program, in which deliveries, skills (Atitude Klabin), potential and also the remuneration of eligible employees are assessed. Among the changes, the highlights are the construction of good conversations and development plans.

Our remuneration guidelines

GRI 102-35, 102-36

To determine remuneration, we use the market methodology with universally comparable factors to measure the relative size of positions, ensuring comparison reliability. We conduct annual salary surveys and analyze the competitiveness of our remuneration practices as compared to the market. Deliveries, skills, performance, potential and salary position in relation to market research are evaluated for salary adjustment decisions.

One of the tools that guide the management of the topic is Klabin’s Remuneration Policy, which is updated periodically to establish guidelines and directives in line with our purposes.

The Executive Board’s remuneration consists of fixed and variable remuneration, including short- and long-term incentives , benefits (life insurance, health care, food vouchers, meal vouchers, private pensions and check-ups) and Guarantee Fund for Length of Service (FGTS). indicators long-term Our strategy for total remuneration is a position aligned with the third market quartile. We adopted indicators for short- and long-term incentives related to the strategy and business cycle, allowing greater alignment with shareholders.

Annual total remuneration ratio

GRI 102-38

In 2019, the ratio of the annual total remuneration of Klabin’s highest-paid individual to the median annual remuneration for all employees was 9.696%. All employees are included in the calculation, considering the integral calculation for annualization of the amounts. Only operations in Brazil and the aspects of base salary data, benefits, short- and long-term incentives were considered for the calculation.

Ratio of the annual total remuneration of the highest-paid individual to the median annual total remuneration for all employees1 2016 2017 2018 2019
15.949% 11.421% 10.780% 9.696%

1Until 2018, the Health Care account was not considered in the calculation, which justifies the variation between the values.

Variation of the ratio of lowest entry level wage compared to local minimum wage

GRI 202-1

We respect the determination of the national minimum wage, regional minimum and the minimum established in union relations for our operations. The minimum wages paid by Klabin are based on collective bargaining agreements and refer to the respective categories represented, regardless of the importance of the unit. Gender is not a factor when establishing these values. We recommend that employment contracts with third parties follow the requirements set forth in CLT and in line with the respective collective bargaining agreements, when applicable.

The lowest salary paid by Klabin in 2019 was 1.02 times higher than the national minimum wage

Variation between the lowest wage by gender in significant operating units and the minimum wage

Operating unit 2016 2017 2018 2019
Men Women Men Women Men Women Men Women
Angatuba 1.51 1.85 1.80 1.80 1.84 1.84 1.81 1.81
Betim 1.11 1.11 1.09 1.09 1.09 1.09 1.09 1.09
Correia Pinto 1.24 1.24 1.21 1.21 1.24 1.24 1.50 1.67
São Paulo 1.85 2.02 1.67 1.97 1.84 1.84 1.81 1.98
Feira de Santana 1.45 2.13 1.43 2.40 1.43 2.41 1.44 2.10
Forestry 1.15 1.31 1.15 1.31 1.16 1.28 1.16 1.31
Goiana 1.22 1.38 1.17 1.31 1.19 1.40 1.15 1.39
Itajaí 1.44 1.44 1.38 1.33 1.44 1.44 1.41 1.41
Jundiaí 1.60 1.94 1.57 1.70 1.52 1.74 1.53 1.72
Lages 1.53 1.70 1.49 1.49 1.52 1.69 1.50 1.50
Manaus 1.02 1.02 1.61 1.71 1.03 1.03 1.02 1.02
Monte Alegre 1.76 1.76 1.61 1.71 1.75 1.75 1.31 1.36
Ortigueira 1.76 1.76 1.71 1.71 1.75 1.75 1.72 1.72
Otacilio Costa 1.24 1.24 1.21 1.21 1.69 1.24 1.44 1.44
Piracicaba 1.75 1.80 1.70 1.75 1.74 1.74 1.72 1.72
Rio Negro 1.12 1.12 1.38 1.24 1.41 1.41 1.39 1.39
São Leopoldo 1.24 1.24 1.24 1.24 1.24 1.24 1.03 1.23
Klabin OVERALL 1.02 1.02 1.02 1.02 1.03 1.03 1.02 1.02

Members of senior management recruited from the local community

GRI 202-2

In 2019, 100% of the directors and managers of Minas Gerais and Rio Grande do Sul had been hired from the same states as our operating units. This percentage was 91% in the state of São Paulo and 89% in Paraná. The results shown in the table reflect the movement in the structure, whether due to strategic issues or the search for greater operational efficiency.

.

Percentage of leadership position members at significant operational units that are hired from the local community1

2016 2017 2018 2019
Amazonas (AM) 0% 0% 0% 0%
Bahia (BA) 100% 50% 50% 50%
Minas Gerais (MG) 100% 100% 100% 100%
Paraná (PR) 94% 88% 85% 89%
Pernambuco (PE) 80% 80% 80% 67%
Santa Catarina (SC) 85% 100% 100% 89%
São Paulo (SP) 99% 96% 92% 91%
Rio Grande do Sul (RS) 100% 100% 100% 100%
Rio de Janeiro (RJ) 100% 100% 100% 0%

1The base for the indicator started in 2016, considering managers who already held or took on a top management position that year (for positions taken before 2016, even professionals coming from other locations are considered locals). As of 2016, the base was set and updated according to manager movement. For location purposes, the reference is the state.

Promoting diversity

GRI 103-1, 103-2, 103-3

 

We believe that the best decisions are made when the work environment is free of discrimination and characterized by several different points of view, experiences, cultures and ways of life. Therefore, we seek to provide job opportunities compatible with people of different aptitudes, skills and life stories.

Diversity is a topic that gained a more strategic approach at Klabin in 2019, with the creation of a governance structure, responsibilities for initiatives attributed in different instances and focus on the purpose of expanding the representativeness of diversity groups in the Company.

The management of the topic is supported by the Policy on Diversity and Promoting Employability.

Cultural evolution at Klabin also highlights this aspect. In 2019, informal movements that arose at the company and fostered reflections and discussions on the diversity led us to catalyze initiatives and create synergies, privileging natural leaders on this issue in the company.

Klabin has been a signatory to the Women’s Empowerment Principle (WEP) since 2018, a UN initiative that promotes initiatives related to the topic.

The upswing of female participation in our workforce by two percentage points in 2019 (from 11% to 13%) already represents an evolution compared to previous years, when this result shifted by 1% in each period. This representation is an important indicator (considering the reality of the sector, which varies between 12% and 14%), but we are still concerned.

To expand this representativeness, we have been promoting initiatives such as the inclusion of women on the shortlist (list of pre-selected candidates) for attraction and selection and a review of these processes, in addition to training on diversity for the teams involved.

Participation by all

 

Under the diversity governance structure, we held several work meetings, both in the corporate areas and in the units, to approve programs and projects in the area with the People Commission. We conducted several awareness actions for all target audiences, in order to boost the culture of promoting greater inclusion and respect in the Company.

Diversity Governance

Corporate area

 

Construction of corporate programs and strategy alignment throughout the organization.

Diversity Committee

 

Representatives from all units are included, identified from a mapping of actions related to the theme in each one.

The group meets every two weeks and is responsible for building and supporting local actions.

Affinity Groups

 

Made up of employees who meet weekly. Responsible for discussions, construction and support of corporate actions related to the themes: Women, Men, Blacks and LGBTQIA+.

People Commission

 

Made up of senior management who meet quarterly. Responsible for program validations and approvals.

In the Climate Survey, we included a question on the feeling of security linked to gender equity for the first time, answered by a considerable sample of employees, demonstrating an overall positive view regarding respect among employees. The action plans resulting from the analysis of these responses will be implemented throughout 2020. .

Our goal is to double the number of women at Klabin by 2025.

Diversity in governance bodies and among employees

GRI 405-1

We have been seeing a maturity in the technical, operational and managerial staff at Klabin, wherein the group over 50 years of age has constantly grown over the last three years, the result of a natural evolution process. In management, the increase observed in the period is in the age group between 30 and 50 years of age.

We also highlight the evolution of the proportion of women observed in greater detail among managers and coordinators, technicians and operational staff. With regard to the ratio of blacks, the result has remained constant over the last three years, stable at 31%.

An analysis of the proportion of People with Disabilities (PCD) shows a constant increase until 2018, with a slight drop in 2019, both in the proportion of PCD women and in the technical, administrative and operational staff. The monitoring of this indicator is the result of our efforts to meet the quota established by Law 8.213/91 (5% of the workforce, for companies with over 1,000 employees), by seeking partnerships for hiring, promoting accessibility in jobs, and raising management’s awareness on the issue.

Percentage of employees per employee category, by gender1

2016 2017 2018 2019
Men Women Men Women Men Women Men Women
Executive Board 93,33% 6,67% 92,86% 7,14% 92,31% 7,69% 91,67% 8,33%
Management and coordination 80,97% 19,03% 80,66% 19,34% 80,52% 19,48% 79,61% 20,39%
Technical 86,02% 13,98% 85,68% 14,32% 84,50% 15,50% 59,65% 40,35%
Administrative 50,42% 49,58% 51,31% 48,69% 49,64% 50,36% 61,17% 38,83%
Operational 95,45% 4,55% 95,44% 4,56% 95,37% 4,63% 94,35% 5,65%
Apprentices 59,17% 40,83% 52,55% 47,45% 49,73% 50,27% 47,23% 52,77%
Interns 53,85% 46,15% 46,53% 53,47% 46,36% 53,64% 41,60% 58,40%
Total 89,23% 10,77% 89,24% 10,76% 88,28% 11,72% 86,95% 13,05%

1The group of professionals identified as “Board of Directors” is contained in the “Administrative” group to consolidate the other indicators until 2018. This group was not considered in 2019.

Percentage of employees per employee category, by age group1

2016 2017 2018 2019
Under 30 years of age Between 30 and 50 years of age Under 30 years of age Between 30 and 50 years of age Under 30 years of age Between 30 and 50 years of age Under 30 years of age Between 30 and 50 years of age
Executive Board 0,00% 26,67% 73,33% 0,00% 35,71% 64,29% 0,00% 46,15% 53,85% 0,00% 50,00% 50,00%
Management and coordination 3,50% 74,17% 22,33% 3,48% 73,50% 23,02% 1,30% 74,03% 24,68% 1,48% 72,20% 26,32%
Technical 23,44% 67,64% 8,92% 26,28% 64,26% 9,46% 20,91% 69,37% 9,72% 25,43% 63,74% 10,83%
Administrative 34,64% 53,28% 12,08% 38,25% 49,78% 11,97% 34,12% 54,67% 11,21% 42,70% 49,46% 7,84%
Operational 31,38% 60,70% 7,92% 33,26% 58,35% 8,39% 28,36% 62,99% 8,65% 27,00% 62,24% 10,76%
Apprentices 99,58% 0,42% 0,00% 99,22% 0,78% 0,00% 100,00% 0,00% 0,00% 100,00% 0,00% 0,00%
Interns 90,38% 7,69% 1,92% 100,00% 0,00% 0,00% 92,72% 7,28% 0,00% 93,60% 6,40% 0,00%
Total 31,60% 59,57% 8,83% 33,88% 56,98% 9,14% 29,93% 60,80% 9,27% 28,72% 60,32% 10,96%

1The group of professionals identified as “Board of Directors” is contained in the “Administrative” group to consolidate the other indicators until 2018. This group was not considered in 2019.

Percentage of black employees per employee category1

2016 2017 2018 2019
Executive Board 0,00% 0,00% 0,00% 0,00%
Management and coordination 8,35% 10,06% 11,87% 14,80%
Technical 18,91% 24,44% 29,15% 21,35%
Administrative 19,85% 21,09% 21,41% 26,31%
Operational 31,30% 33,21% 33,35% 33,17%
Apprentices 54,58% 37,65% 35,95% 37,02%
Interns 34,62% 60,40% 33,77% 28,00%
Total 29,04% 31,06% 31,26% 30,84%

1The group of professionals identified as “Board of Directors” is contained in the “Administrative” group to consolidate the other indicators until 2018. This group was not considered in 2019. Blacks, according to the IBGE, include people who call themselves blacks and mixed ethnicity. The percentage is calculated regarding the total number of employees of the gender in the category.

Percentage of black employees per employee category, by gender1

2016 2017 2018 2019
Men Women Men Women Men Women Men Women
Executive Board 0,00% 0,00% 0,00% 0,00% 0,00% 0,00% 0,00% 0,00%
Management and coordination 8,87% 6,12% 10,79% 7,00% 11,06% 15,24% 14,46% 16,13%
Technical 14,24% 47,62% 18,56% 59,63% 21,40% 71,43% 21,71% 20,82%
Administrative 25,15% 14,46% 27,31% 14,54% 27,79% 15,12% 27,84% 23,90%
Operational 31,59% 25,25% 33,65% 24,07% 33,82% 23,83% 33,76% 23,38%
Apprentices 58,45% 48,98% 39,55% 35,54% 33,70% 38,17% 37,84% 36,29%
Interns 32,14% 37,50% 61,70% 59,26% 40,00% 28,40% 25,00% 30,14%
Total 29,82% 22,52% 31,97% 23,49% 32,09% 24,99% 31,95% 23,42%

1The group of professionals identified as “Board of Directors” is contained in the “Administrative” group to consolidate the other indicators until 2018. This group was not considered in 2019. Blacks, according to the IBGE, include people who call themselves blacks and mixed ethnicity. The percentage is calculated regarding the total number of employees of the gender in the category.

Percentage of PCD per employee category1

2016 2017 2018 2019
Men Women Men Women Men Women Men Women
Executive Board 0,00% 0,00% 0,00% 0,00% 0,00% 0,00% 0,00% 0,00%
Management and coordination 1,44% 0,00% 1,68% 0,00% 2,07% 0,00% 1,86% 0,00%
Technical 2,32% 0,00% 2,15% 0,00% 2,62% 0,00% 2,76% 1,17%
Administrative 2,99% 1,67% 2,70% 1,65% 3,33% 2,14% 2,95% 1,39%
Operational 2,39% 0,61% 2,44% 1,31% 2,76% 2,81% 2,65% 2,69%
Apprentices 0,00% 1,02% 4,48% 0,83% 1,63% 0,00% 0,90% 0,00%
Interns 0,00% 0,00% 0,00% 0,00% 0,00% 0,00% 1,92% 0,00%
Total 2,35% 1,02% 2,42% 1,20% 2,73% 1,73% 2,62% 1,53%

1The group of professionals identified as “Board of Directors” is contained in the “Administrative” group to consolidate the other indicators until 2018. This group was not considered in 2019.

Percentage of individuals within the organization’s governance bodies, by gender

2016 2017 2018 2019
Men 76,19% 80,00% 81,48% 81,82%
Women 23,81% 20,00% 18,52% 18,18%

Percentage of individuals within the organization’s governance bodies, by age group1

2016 2017 2018 2019
Under 30 years of age 0,00% 0,00% 0,00% 0,00%
Between 30 and 50 19,05% 24,00% 25,93% 27,27%
years of age 80,95% 76,00% 74,07% 72,73%

 1There are no blacks or People with Disabilities (PCDs) on Klabin’s Board of Directors.

Ratio of the basic salary and remuneration of women to men for each employee category, by significant operating units1

GRI 405-2

 

2016 2017 2018 2019
Klabin Monte Alegre Puma Klabin Monte Alegre Puma Klabin Monte Alegre Puma Klabin Monte Alegre Puma
Executive Board basic salary (BRL) 0.78 N/A N/A 0.83 N/A N/A 0.78 N/A N/A 0.92      N/A N/A
remuneration (BRL) 0.68 N/A N/A 0.67 N/A N/A 0.63 N/A N/A 0.92      N/A N/A
Management and coordination basic salary (BRL) 0.84 0.77 1.16 0.85 0.83 1.17 0.86 0.89 1.16 0.96      0.93      0.90     
remuneration (BRL) 0.78 0.73 1.37 0.77 0.81 1.49 0.77 0.85 1.50 0.96      0.93      0.90     
Technical basic salary (BRL) 0.85 0.82 0.70 0.86 0.79 0.79 0.86 0.77 0.69 0.93      0.99      0.97     
remuneration (BRL) 0.83 0.81 0.70 0.86 0.78 0.79 0.85 0.77 0.69 0.93      0.99      0.98     
Administrative basic salary (BRL) 0.85 0.73 0.83 0.86 0.76 0.73 0.83 0.75 0.82 0.93      0.98      0.98     
remuneration (BRL) 0.84 0.74 0.83 0.86 0.76 0.75 0.83 0.75 0.82 0.93      0.98      0.98     
Operational basic salary (BRL) 0.84 0.76 0.62 0.90 0.80 0.68 0.90 0.79 0.69 0.92      0.97      0.97     
remuneration (BRL) 0.84 0.76 0.62 0.90 0.79 0.68 0.90 0.79 0.69 0.92      0.97      0.97     
Apprentices basic salary (BRL) 1.09 0.94 1.00 1.13 1.14 N/A 1.10 0.97 1.00 1.01      1.13 N/A
remuneration (BRL) 1.24 0.94 0.99 1.31 1.14 N/A 1.11 0.96 1.00 1.01      1.13 N/A
Interns basic salary (BRL) 1.06 0.95 0.00 0.94 1.27 1.11 0.91 0.93 1.07 0.93 1.00      1.01     
remuneration (BRL) 1.06 0.95 0.00 0.93 1.27 1.11 0.91 0.93 1.07 0.93 1.00      1.01     
Total  basic salary (BRL) 1.24 0.97 0.61 1.26 0.96 0.61 1.20 0.90 0.61 0.94      1.00      0.97     
remuneration (BRL) 1.15 0.99 0.58 1.17 0.94 0.59 1.13 0.86 0.58 0.94      1.000.91 0.97     

1Remuneration includes nominal salary + short-term incentives (ICP) + long-term incentives (ILP). There were no directors at the Puma and Monte Alegre units during the period considered. In 2017 and 2019, there were also no apprentices at the Puma unit.

Appreciating life

GRI 103-1, 103-2, 103-3

GROWTH AND STRONG RESULTS ONLY HAVE REAL MEANING IF OUR OWN EMPLOYEES AND THIRD PARTY CONTRACTORS PERFORM THEIR ACTIVITIES SAFELY.

We posted a significant improvement in our safety rates in 2019, reaching historical records at Klabin. Even so, we believe that even better rates can be pursued and achieved, aiming for excellence. We will not be satisfied until we attain zero occurrences.

Safety improvements result from a more strategic view and the recent structuring of governance for the matter at the Company. Numbers (detailed indicators are further presented in this chapter) reflect a change in approach. In addition to seeking continuous improvement of work environments, we encourage employees to be the protagonists of this story. With the motto “Appreciating Life: a caring gesture”, internal initiatives reinforce that everyone is responsible for taking care of colleagues.

We expanded our monitoring on this front in 2019. In addition to tracking the classic safety indices, we also included high potential occurrences on the radar. These are situations that could have, but ultimately did not result in accidents. The operation then becomes more preventive and less reactive.

Health and safety management

GRI 403-1, 403-2, 403-8

We adopted our own Occupational Health and Safety Management system, which encompasses all of the company’s operations and employees, including our service providers. Audited internally and externally, the system is guided by three fundamentals: visible commitment, line responsibility and operational discipline.

In 2019, a complete review of the Management System was undertaken, focusing on building standards and guidelines that are more consistent and compliant to the business and, especially, on the mapping of critical activities, which allowed us to gain comprehensive knowledge on many of the routine activities that poised higher risk for employees.

Based on such analysis, Critical Activity Requirements (RACs) were established for our industrial and forestry operations. The process allowed us to identify gaps and resulted in the drafting of protocols for good standardization practices, enhanced integration among teams and further developed into strategic safety plans for the units.

Our operations’ compliance percentage with the protocols and guidelines is an relevant indicator, monitored to allow assessing the progress of our Management System. We expect at least a 10% evolution by 2021..

The three management pillars

GRI 103-1, 103-2, 103-3

FACILITIES

Ensure equipment safety and reliability. Improve and maintain the work environment offered to our professionals.

MANAGEMENT/METHOD

Continuously improve the way we address security in our routine. Keep a critical eye on our accident prevention and mitigation procedures by creating and reviewing policies, guidelines and requirements.

PEOPLE

Value good practices and encourage our employees to care for one another. Train them on rules and procedures, in addition to bringing leaders closer to the routine.

Facilities

We started a round of equipment analyses for all units in 2018 and consolidated it in 2019. The focus was to identify risk situations and raise awareness among leaders to act more closely with the teams in risk mapping and prevention. This study will allow us to implement a safety inspection routine.

Behavioral management

We updated the behavioral audit model, which was replaced by Safety in Focus. The proposal addresses the matter more extensively, analyzing the behavior of employees based on dialogue for the purpose of identifying contributing factors for a given behavior.
We also developed an application for filing Safety Reports. Employees can use their mobile phones to inform management of risk behaviors, environments inappropriate for work and good practices as well. The pilot project will be tested in 2020.

Measuring the maturity of the safety culture

 

We completed the Safety Culture Diagnosis throughout the Packaging and Paper businesses using the Hearts & Minds methodology, which allowed us to ascertain the maturity of our operations. We fluctuate between “Reactive”, a level at which safety actions still depend on an order or event; “Calculating”, in which the management system is well implemented and encourages good behavior; and “Proactive”, whose attention is on the future and not on responding to data from the past or present events.

The diagnosis of the cultural model allows us to be more assertive in safety-related actions, whether through a method or leadership model. We want to reach the highest level in 2030, which is the “Generative” level. At this stage, organizations exceed the highest safety standards, leadership is always aware of what is happening and employees work attentively and study new preventive possibilities. This will guarantee an accident rate close to zero.

The analysis at the Pulp Unit was interrupted due to complications related to the Covid-19 pandemic and should be resumed as soon as possible. In 2020, we also plan to make a comparison of Hearts & Minds with another methodology already applied at the Forestry Unit, in order to establish strategies that meet the cultural model of each unit.

Identification of risks and accidents

To manage risks we use the following tools, whose implementation varies according to the pace and needs of each unit:

Right of refusal: employees have the right and obligation to interrupt an activity when they find themselves, their colleagues and assets in a risk condition.

Investigation

 

All occurrences of accidents and incidents of high potential are investigated. Root causes are identified through the “5 whys” methodology. Records are kept on the company’s own action manager system, which allows for filing, monitoring of actions and evaluation of effectiveness, through an action manager called PLAK. In some Klabin businesses, such as Papers and Forestry, specialists are trained to ensure the quality of the investigation process.

Leadership engagement

The proximity between leaders and their teams makes all the difference in good practices. Management is both support and example. That is why, in 2019:

Safety-oriented module added to leader training.

The Vidas Mudadas [Changed Lives] concept was deployed to raise awareness among senior management about the impact of accidents on the lives of employees when there are, for example, definitive consequences.

Safety indicators

 

In 2019, we recorded an important evolution in our work safety results, such as the historical rates of general accident frequency rate (see details in the table below) and severity rate (101) and the best lost-time accident rate over the paste five years at Klabin: 2.46.

The progress in the indicators reflects the increasingly strategic vision on the Company towards this aspect, especially in the past two years, with the structuring of a corporate management and the consolidation of a governance structure for the matter.

Accident frequency rate from – Klabin S.A.

2016 2017 2018 2019
11.08 7.88 8.80 6.30

Work-related injuries

GRI 403-9

This indicator was updated by the GRI in 2018, when we began to report the information on the following tables.

Direct and indirect employee health and safety rates and figures1

  2018 2019
Number of fatalities as a result of work-related injuries 3 0
Rate of fatalities as a result of work-related injuries 0.07 0.00
Number of high-consequence work-related injuries (excluding fatalities) 3 0
Rate of high-consequence work-related injuries (excluding fatalities) 0.07 0.00
Number of recordable work-related injuries 400 333
Rate of recordable work-related injuries 8.80 6.30

1The main types of injury in 2018 included contusions, lacerations, abrasions, sprains and dislocation. In 2019, the main types of injuries included contusions, sprains, abrasions and lacerations. In 2018, direct employees worked 29,123,893.82 hours and indirect employees worked 17,210,526.43 hours, while in 2019, direct employees worked 28,093,228.00 hours and indirect employees worked 24,748,599.00 hours. The calculation was made based on 1,000,000 hours worked. For direct employees, the SAP system database, number of occurrences, and manhours worked were used. For workers who are not employees, but whose work and/or workplace is controlled by Klabin, the database of the senior system and reports made by the business units were used.

Direct and indirect employee health and safety rates and figures1

2018 2019
Direct employees Indirect employees Direct employees Indirect employees
Number of fatalities as a result of work-related injuries 0 3 0 0
Rate of fatalities as a result of work-related injuries 0.00 0.17 0.00 0.00
 Number of high-consequence work-related injuries (excluding fatalities) 5 3 0 0
 Rate of high-consequence work-related injuries (excluding fatalities) 0.17 0.17 0.00 0.00
Number of recordable work-related injuries 298 102 224 109
Rate of recordable work-related injuries 10.55 5.93 7.97 4.40

1The main types of injury in 2018 included contusions, lacerations, abrasions, sprains and dislocation. In 2019, the main types of injuries included contusions, sprains, abrasions and lacerations. In 2018, direct employees worked 29,123,893.82 hours and indirect employees worked 17,210,526.43 hours, while in 2019, direct employees worked 28,093,228.00 hours and indirect employees worked 24,748,599.00 hours. The calculation was made based on 1,000,000 hours worked. For direct employees, the SAP system database, number of occurrences, and manhours worked were used. For workers who are not employees, but whose work and/or workplace is controlled by Klabin, the database of the senior system and reports made by the business units were used.

Direct and indirect employee health and safety rate by business, region and gender

2018 2019
Men Women Men Women
Number of fatalities as a result of work-related injuries 3 0 0 0
Rate of fatalities as a result of work-related injuries 0.19 0.00 0.00 0.00
 Number of high-consequence work-related injuries (excluding fatalities) 8 0 0 0
 Rate of high-consequence work-related injuries (excluding fatalities) 0.19 0.00 0.00 0.00
Number of recordable work-related injuries 390 10 326 7
Rate of recordable work-related injuries 11.20 6.25 6.71 1.66

Direct and indirect employee health and safety rates by region¹

2018 2019
North Northeast Southeast South North Northeast Southeast South
Number of fatalities as a result of work-related injuries 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
Rate of fatalities as a result of work-related injuries 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.08 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Number of high-consequence work-related injuries (excluding fatalities) 1 1 1 5 0 0 0 0
Rate of high-consequence work-related injuries (excluding fatalities) 1.62 0.29 0.16 0.14 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Number of recordable work-related injuries 1 35 57 307 0 26 31 276
Rate of recordable work-related injuries 1.60 10.12 9.39 8.69 0.00 6.88 4.71 6.58

1Klabin had no operations in the Midwest region during the period.

Indirect employee health and safety rates by region1

2018 2019
Norte Nordeste Sudeste Sul Norte Nordeste Sudeste Sul
Número de óbitos como resultado de lesões relacionadas ao trabalho 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Taxa de óbitos como resultado de lesões relacionadas ao trabalho 0,00 0,00 0,00 0,00 0,00 0,00 0,00 0,00
Número de lesões relacionadas ao trabalho de alta consequência (excluindo óbitos) 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0
Taxa de lesões relacionadas ao trabalho de alta consequência (excluindo óbitos) 1,87 0,36 0,19 0,10 0,00 0,00 0,00 0,00
Número de lesões relacionadas ao trabalho reportáveis 1 26 57 214 0 21 29 174
Direct employee health and safety rates by region1 1,80 9,27 10,81 10,90 0,00 7,50 5,20 9,06

 

1Klabin had no operations in the Midwest region during the period.

Indirect employee health and safety rates by region1

2018 2019
North Northeast Southeast South North Northeast Southeast South
Number of fatalities as a result of work-related injuries 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
Rate of fatalities as a result of work-related injuries 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.19 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
 Number of high-consequence work-related injuries (excluding fatalities) 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0
Rate of high-consequence work-related injuries (excluding fatalities) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.19 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Number of recordable work-related injuries 0 9 0 93 0 5 2 102
Rate of recordable work-related injuries 0.00 13.76 0.00 5.93 0.00 5.1 2.00 4.49

1Klabin had no operations in the Midwest region during the period.

Employee health and safety rates by business unit – Papers

2018 2019
Direct employees Indirect employees Total Direct employees Indirect employees Total
Number of fatalities as a result of work-related injuries 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rate of fatalities as a result of work-related injuries 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Number of high-consequence work-related injuries (excluding fatalities) 0 3 3 0 0 0
Rate of high-consequence work-related injuries (excluding fatalities) 0.00 0.59 0.28 0.00 0.00 0.00
Number of recordable work-related injuries 43 38 81 35 48 83
Rate of recordable work-related injuries 7.70 7.40 7.60 6.34 5.36 5.73

Employee health and safety rates by business unit – Pulp

2018 2019
Direct employees Indirect employees Total Direct employees Indirect employees Total
Number of fatalities as a result of work-related injuries 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rate of fatalities as a result of work-related injuries 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
 Number of high-consequence work-related injuries (excluding fatalities) 0 1 1 0 0 0
 Rate of high-consequence work-related injuries (excluding fatalities) 0.00 0.49 0.29 0.00 0.00 0.00
Number of recordable work-related injuries 14 21 35 14 23 37
Rate of recordable work-related injuries 9.70 10.20 10.00 8.42 6.32 6.98

Employee health and safety rates by business unit – Forestry

2018 2019
Direct employees Indirect employees Total Direct employees Indirect employees Total
Number of fatalities as a result of work-related injuries 0 2 2 0 0 0
Rate of fatalities as a result of work-related injuries 0.00 0.26 0.12 0.00 0.00 0.00
 Number of high-consequence work-related injuries (excluding fatalities) 0 0 0 0 0 0
 Rate of high-consequence work-related injuries (excluding fatalities) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Number of recordable work-related injuries 121 31 152 99 24 123
Rate of recordable work-related injuries 14.10 4.10 9.40 12.26 2.74 7.31

Employee health and safety rates by business unit – Packaging and Recycled Materials

2018 2019
Direct employees Indirect employees Total Direct employees Indirect employees Total
Number of fatalities as a result of work-related injuries 0 1 1 0 0 0
Rate of fatalities as a result of work-related injuries 0.00 0.73 0.10 0.00 0.00 0.00
 Number of high-consequence work-related injuries (excluding fatalities) 3 0 3 0 0 0
 Rate of high-consequence work-related injuries (excluding fatalities) 0.33 0.00 0.29 0.00 0.00 0.00
Number of recordable work-related injuries 103 8 111 68 9 77
Rate of recordable work-related injuries 11.40 5.80 10.70 7.72 5.23 7.33

Employee health and safety rates by business unit – Sacks

2018 2019
Direct employees Indirect employees Total Direct employees Indirect employees Total
Number of fatalities as a result of work-related injuries 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rate of fatalities as a result of work-related injuries 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
 Number of high-consequence work-related injuries (excluding fatalities) 2 0 2 0 0 0
 Rate of high-consequence work-related injuries (excluding fatalities) 0.99 0.00 0.73 0.00 0.00 0.00
Number of recordable work-related injuries 17 4 21 8 5 13
Rate of recordable work-related injuries 5.60 3.70 5.10 2.72 2.43 2.95

Employee health and safety rates by business unit – Corporate1

2018 2019
Direct employees Indirect employees Total Direct employees Indirect employees Total
Number of fatalities as a result of work-related injuries 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rate of fatalities as a result of work-related injuries 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Number of high-consequence work-related injuries (excluding fatalities) 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rate of high-consequence work-related injuries (excluding fatalities) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Number of recordable work-related injuries 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rate of recordable work-related injuries 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

1Klabin does not control the number of recordable work-related accidents by incident type on a corporate level, nor the number of potential adverse events (“near misses”) identified. Occurrences recorded that resulted in over six months of leave were considered in order to account for high-consequence work-related injuries. Report extracted from SAP for direct employees and units consulted for indirect employees.

Lost-Time Injury Frequency Rate (LTIFR) – Employees

LTIFR 2016 2017 2018 2019
N employees/ million hours 2,84 3,43 3,98 2,95
% Employees covered 100 100 100 100

Lost-Time Injury Frequency Rate (LTIFR) – Contractors

LTIFR 2016 2017 2018 2019
N contractors/ million hours 2,87 2,00 2,73 1,82
% Contractors covered 100 100 100 100

Main commitments and goals related to health and quality of life

103-1, 103-2, 103-3

Focus on prevention as a primary factor in maintaining the health of our employees;

Comply with the provisions of the Occupational Health Medical Control Program (PCMSO) – by conducting occupational examinations according to the mapped risk and frequency;

Guide third parties in managing the occupational examination requirements for service providers that work in our facilities, following the list of minimum requirements related to mandatory medical and supplementary exams;

Implement at least three health-related pilot programs using indicators to measure effectiveness.

Objectives of the Occupational Health Medical Control Program (PCMSO)

 

  1. Survey the agents and risks of the activities developed at the company.
  2. Prevent and mitigate risks related to worker health.
  3. Advise on the use of Collective and Individual Protection Equipment.
  4. Ensure the investigation of work-related and occupational health incidents and accidents.
  5. Ensure the application of management tools and practices.
  6. Ensure proper management and recovery of those on leave.

Occupational health services

GRI 403-3

To eliminate or minimize occupational health risks, we maintain the Service Specialized in Health and Occupational Medicine (SESMT), composed of doctors, nurses and occupational health nursing technicians in the units, in accordance with current regulations and legislation. Clinical and supplementary examinations are conducted within the units or in specialized clinics.

Our employees are free to seek assistance from private healthcare and dental services, a benefit offered to all employees and dependents. We maintain a specialty center in the Paraná region, which exclusively cares for 18,000 people.

We monitor indicators of leave (through certificates of health) and social security with the INSS.

Focus on prevention

GRI 403-6

Prevention awareness actions: Internal Work-related Accident Prevention Week (Sipat), Health Week and vaccination campaigns, Pink October and Blue November, among others.

Medication co-pay benefit.

Chronic Issues Program: Hypertension, Obesity, Diabetes (for some units).

Health Committee: periodic meetings to analyze the occupational health data in order to define actions in health promotion and prevention for the employee and family.

Compliance

Our medical staff signs a confidentiality agreement on the systems provided by the healthcare operator to track employee use, as well as to ensure the storage of medical charts in the outpatient clinics. Access to the company’s healthcare systems is controlled through the Governance, Risk and Compliance (GRC) system. The medical and nursing staff also comply with the codes of ethics and conduct of their respective operating boards, as well as the regulatory precepts for the technical activity and current legislation.

Support programs

Viver Bem program:

a 24/7 phone service managed by an independent company, which provides guidance to employees, at first approach, to solve personal problems. A trained team identifies the nature of the problem and make referrals to a psychologist, social worker, lawyer or financial adviser, as the case may be. When it comes to Klabin, the matter is referred to our Ombudsman.

Alcohol and drug prevention program:

covers the Monte Alegre, Otacílio Costa and Correia Pinto units, as well as the Forestry Unit in Paraná. Based on random and authorized testing, it seeks to identify situations involving chemical dependency so that from there, we can offer help and subsidize treatment. In the case of third parties, the outsourced company receives guidance on how to handle the matter.

Benefit plan

GRI 201-3

Our employees have medical and dental assistance, agreements with pharmacies, transportation and food benefits, life insurance, childcare and school supply assistance, among others. The pension plan is managed by a private and independent entity, in which there is no obligation for the company to hold reserves to ensure pensions. All professionals, regardless of position, can participate by making voluntary contributions. The company’s contribution includes the following modalities:

For positions whose salary is less than BRL 4,736 and the employee is over the age of 55, the payment is up to six times the employee’s salary, made when there is a need, and the benefit is cost-free for the employee.

For positions with a salary higher than BRL 4,736, employees can contribute between 1% and 9% of their contribution salary. Klabin’s match varies from 100% to 150% of the employee contribution, according to their length of employment.

Benefits fair

Every two years, we hold the Benefits Fair at all units to update our employees on the benefits to which they are entitled. The initiative gathers suppliers in the fields of healthcare, dental, insurance and private pension plans, as well as Klabin representatives. The event is held on an on-call basis, to cover all work shifts. The team provides information and answers questions about benefits offered to employees and their dependents.

Work-related health indicators

 

GRI 403-10

The main work-related health problems in our units are associated with musculoskeletal diseases (tenosynovitis and tendonitis, for example) and back problems. The risks related to these diseases are determined in ergonomic analyses, such as the one conducted in 2019 at all units, for which action plans were developed, to be implemented starting in 2020. 

In 2019, 27 occupational health problems were recorded among our employees, compared to 16 in 2018, 10 in 2017 and 21 in the previous year.

 

 

Number of cases of recordable work-related illness, by region

2016 2017 2018 2019
Northern Region 0 0 0 0
Northeastern Region 0 1 1 1
Southeastern Region 0 0 0 0
Southern Region 6 8 9 16
Total 6 9 10 17

 

Number of cases of recordable work-related illness, by gender

2016 2017 2018 2019
Men 5 8 9 16
Women 1 1 1 1
Total 6 9 10 17

Occupational Illness Frequency Rate (OIFR) – Employees

OIFR 2016 2017 2018 2019
N employees/ million hours 2,16 3,15 3,43 5,83
% Employees covered 100 100 100 100